What Is Diep Flap?

What Is Diep Flap?

  Diep flap is a type of breast reconstruction that is offered to breast cancer survivors and breast cancer patients who have had to undergo a mastectomy or a double mastectomy.  The process is relatively new and has replaced a procedure called TRAM flap.  Diep Flap stands for Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator.  Here are the details about Diep flap in Austin and around the world. Diep flap is a process during which, skin is taken from the abdomen area and attached to the breast area where a mastectomy has been performed.  The lower abdomen is chosen because there is often excess skin in that area that is easy for surgeons to use without posing any great harm to the patient.  For double mastectomy patients, the surgeons must have enough skin to work with in order to use Diep flap to reconstruct both breasts. The process of Diep flap is quite realistic.  Women who undergo this procedure often end up with a very realistic breast reconstruction.  Some women may require a second procedure after the Diep flap is complete to help shape the reconstructed breast and to give it a touch up on the sizing.  This is because surgery can often time cause swelling and other issues that will make the initial process slightly off. Diep flap in Dallas and the rest of the world is very important because it helps women gain back something that they lost during the battle for cancer.  This small gain can help give them the spirit to continue the fight and become one of the growing number of cancer survivors.  It can also...
When Should You See A Breast Reconstruction Surgeon?

When Should You See A Breast Reconstruction Surgeon?

  When it comes to breast reconstruction after mastectomy, timing is very important. While many people advocate and encourage immediate reconstruction – reconstruction at the same time as the mastectomy surgery – it is not always feasible and advisable. One major determinant of the timing of reconstructive breast surgery is the stage of the breast cancer. In stage I or stage II breast cancer, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and other targeted therapies may not be necessary after the mastectomy. In such cases, it is advisable that immediate reconstruction be performed. However, in stage III or stage IV breast cancer, delaying the reconstruction is often advised because radiation therapy and chemotherapy are usually needed. Reconstructive breast surgery usually requires extra healing time; therefore, radiation therapy or chemotherapy will be unduly delayed. Another problem that arises if immediate reconstruction is performed in the presence of stage III or stage IV breast cancer is that radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and other targeted therapies tend to cause a reconstructed breast to lose volume, change in color and texture, and inevitably, cause undesirable changes to its overall appearance. This means that having such therapies after reconstruction will defeat the very purpose of the reconstruction. Hence, surgeons advise their patients to wait until radiation and chemotherapy are finished before having their breast reconstruction. Your overall health is another factor that largely determines the timing of the your breast reconstruction. In the presence of diabetes, a circulatory disorder, a bleeding problem, or other comorbidities, you will likely be first advised to recover completely from your mastectomy before having the reconstruction. Therefore, the timing of your reconstructive breast surgery...