Breast Reconstruction Method Using Women’s Own Tissue—Is It Safe?

Breast Reconstruction Method Using Women’s Own Tissue—Is It Safe?

  Nearly 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the United States. This diagnosis evokes fears and anxieties, but it also presents women with a choice between two options: breast-conservation treatment and mastectomy. For women who choose the latter, breast reconstruction may be necessary to restore the breast mound and maintain quality of life after the end of oncological treatments. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the most important consequence following a mastectomy is the psychological impact of the altered physical condition. This impact can include anxiety, depression, and negative concepts of body image and sexual virility. Recent studies have shown that breast reconstruction following a mastectomy can be highly successful in improving the quality of life for patients. However, women have two primary choices if they choose to go this path: utilizing an artificial implant (known as implant reconstruction), or using tissue from another part of the body (referred to as autologous reconstruction). Implant vs. Autologous   It’s ultimately a matter of preference for the patient, however, there are important differences to consider. It was assumed that implant and autologous breast reconstruction were the opposite of one another. Implants were easier to deal with in the beginning but required more medical intervention over time. Autologous reconstruction was more difficult in the beginning but required less medical intervention as the patient aged. Recently, researchers compared the safety of the two methods, and their conclusions were significant. According to their findings, implant reconstruction carries a higher risk of reconstructive failure and surgical-site infection than autologous reconstruction. While skin or flap necrosis was more common...
STUDY: Over 50% of Breast Cancer Survivors Aren’t Well-Informed Going Into Reconstruction Surgery

STUDY: Over 50% of Breast Cancer Survivors Aren’t Well-Informed Going Into Reconstruction Surgery

http://txdiepflap.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/BURN-PKG-Breast-Cancer-Risks-CC.mp4   AUSTIN, Texas — Going through reconstruction surgery after a mastectomy is a big decision. According to a recent study, most breast cancer patients don’t know enough about which procedure is right for them. When going to consultations, remember the following: Bring someone with you Request esources on paper Don’t over-WebMD it, but the internet can be a resource “When you’re told that you have breast cancer. You don’t hear anything but cancer.” Once Keara Madani had the shock of her life, she had a mastectomy. Then, she explored reconstruction surgery. “It’s scary and it’s a big decision,” Madani said. There are several types of reconstruction and the choices can be overwhelming. The Journal of the American Medical Association study found most patients and doctors don’t talk enough. The study found that 43 percent of patients had a good understanding of the procedure, but only 14 percent knew of the risks. “It’s not surprising, we get a lot of patients who’ve had reconstructions who say, ‘I didn’t even know about this other thing that I could’ve done,'” said St. David’s Surgical Hospital’s Dr. John Eggleston. Aside from doctors providing honest medical advice, he said patients are their own best advocates — especially when it comes to research, second opinions and finding a support network. “If inappropriate selections are made then there are, maybe, certain risks to which a patient is exposed to, which they never needed to be exposed.” Madani talked to her surgeon about her options and brought a friend to that discussion. “Resources on paper is probably the best way because you can go back and...