The Advantages of Having a Mastectomy

The Advantages of Having a Mastectomy

Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among American women, with about one in eight women developing it in the course of their lifetime. Moreover, the risk of developing it doubles if you have a first-degree relative that has already been diagnosed with the disease. Although advances in research and treatment are made almost every year, breast cancer still holds some of the highest death rates.     Treatment options depend on the patient and the progression of the disease. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy are some of the most common ways of killing cancer cells. Mastectomy is one of the best options patients have in treating the disease. While the impact it can have on a person’s confidence and mental well-being is significant, this procedure is more likely to remove all cancerous tissue. Before deciding if this option is right for you, talk to your local breast surgeon in Austin about its advantages and disadvantages. Benefits and Risks of Mastectomy You have different surgery options to choose from when it comes to mastectomy. Total mastectomy will remove the breast and nipple, but not the lymph nodes that are a part of your immune system. This solution is best suited for breast cancers with lower risks. Modified mastectomy, on the other hand, removes all breast tissue, including nipple and lymph nodes located in the armpit. This option is usually recommended for more invasive breast cancers. Radical mastectomy additionally removes the lining of the chest muscles and is only recommended if the cancer has spread to this area. There is also skin-sparing mastectomy that only...
3 Things You Can Expect After Breast Reconstruction Surgery

3 Things You Can Expect After Breast Reconstruction Surgery

  Breast Reconstruction Surgery is a complicated procedure, both during and after the operation. There are some problems that could arise in the days following surgery but, often, these symptoms may be completely normal. It’s natural to be paranoid after a surgery of this magnitude. To help alleviate some of your worries, here’s a list of three completely normal things to expect after Breast Reconstruction Surgery:   Bruising, Swelling, and Soreness The most common complaint from women who receive this surgery is that the bruising, swelling, and soreness around the operation site doesn’t disappear for quite some time. According to Cancer.org, patients can expect to feel soreness for a week or two after the surgery. Bruising and swelling can last for up to 8 weeks, and it’s important to be patient while these symptoms subside. Overexertion can cause the swelling to continue for an unnecessarily long period of time. Women who had “flaps” used during the surgery can expect these symptoms to last a little longer, as this procedure is more invasive. Scar Tissue Unfortunately, no matter what, you will be left with some scarring after a procedure of this magnitude. Patients will find scarring around the incision site. It can take up to 2 years for the tissue to fully heal and excess scarring to fade away. The core scar will never completely disappear. Scarring can also cause emotional distress or temporary body dysmorphia if patients aren’t mentally prepared. Bra Discomfort Your doctor might recommend wearing a bra that’s supportive enough to keep your reconstructed breasts from drifting, but it’s important not to use one with an...
Breast Reconstruction Method Using Women’s Own Tissue—Is It Safe?

Breast Reconstruction Method Using Women’s Own Tissue—Is It Safe?

  Nearly 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year in the United States. This diagnosis evokes fears and anxieties, but it also presents women with a choice between two options: breast-conservation treatment and mastectomy. For women who choose the latter, breast reconstruction may be necessary to restore the breast mound and maintain quality of life after the end of oncological treatments. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the most important consequence following a mastectomy is the psychological impact of the altered physical condition. This impact can include anxiety, depression, and negative concepts of body image and sexual virility. Recent studies have shown that breast reconstruction following a mastectomy can be highly successful in improving the quality of life for patients. However, women have two primary choices if they choose to go this path: utilizing an artificial implant (known as implant reconstruction), or using tissue from another part of the body (referred to as autologous reconstruction). Implant vs. Autologous   It’s ultimately a matter of preference for the patient, however, there are important differences to consider. It was assumed that implant and autologous breast reconstruction were the opposite of one another. Implants were easier to deal with in the beginning but required more medical intervention over time. Autologous reconstruction was more difficult in the beginning but required less medical intervention as the patient aged. Recently, researchers compared the safety of the two methods, and their conclusions were significant. According to their findings, implant reconstruction carries a higher risk of reconstructive failure and surgical-site infection than autologous reconstruction. While skin or flap necrosis was more common...
STUDY: Over 50% of Breast Cancer Survivors Aren’t Well-Informed Going Into Reconstruction Surgery

STUDY: Over 50% of Breast Cancer Survivors Aren’t Well-Informed Going Into Reconstruction Surgery

http://txdiepflap.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/BURN-PKG-Breast-Cancer-Risks-CC.mp4   AUSTIN, Texas — Going through reconstruction surgery after a mastectomy is a big decision. According to a recent study, most breast cancer patients don’t know enough about which procedure is right for them. When going to consultations, remember the following: Bring someone with you Request esources on paper Don’t over-WebMD it, but the internet can be a resource “When you’re told that you have breast cancer. You don’t hear anything but cancer.” Once Keara Madani had the shock of her life, she had a mastectomy. Then, she explored reconstruction surgery. “It’s scary and it’s a big decision,” Madani said. There are several types of reconstruction and the choices can be overwhelming. The Journal of the American Medical Association study found most patients and doctors don’t talk enough. The study found that 43 percent of patients had a good understanding of the procedure, but only 14 percent knew of the risks. “It’s not surprising, we get a lot of patients who’ve had reconstructions who say, ‘I didn’t even know about this other thing that I could’ve done,'” said St. David’s Surgical Hospital’s Dr. John Eggleston. Aside from doctors providing honest medical advice, he said patients are their own best advocates — especially when it comes to research, second opinions and finding a support network. “If inappropriate selections are made then there are, maybe, certain risks to which a patient is exposed to, which they never needed to be exposed.” Madani talked to her surgeon about her options and brought a friend to that discussion. “Resources on paper is probably the best way because you can go back and...
10 Things to Consider before Undergoing Breast Reconstruction Surgery

10 Things to Consider before Undergoing Breast Reconstruction Surgery

There is much written on the internet about this topic, and good number of women commenting on forums wish they did their homework before agreeing to have breast reconstructive surgery. In fact, a 2016 study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center has called for the provision of better information about the pros and cons of the surgery to breast cancer patients who underwent a mastectomy. Whatever your reasons, don’t make the mistake of rushing into a decision. Instead, you can use this checklist of things to consider as a starting point. Research. There is a wealth of information on the web, some better than others. Check out reputable sites like the Susan G. Komen site or Breastcancer.org. Remember, you are making a huge decision which will affect the rest of your life. Do your homework. Talk to your doctor – and maybe a few more. Discuss your options with your plastic surgeon and don’t settle for the one that he or she is most comfortable doing. You may have to go elsewhere to get the procedure that you ultimately want. At Breast Cancer Associates, we will be happy to review your options with you. It’s all about you. Breast reconstruction surgery is a personal decision, and should never be done to please a spouse, family member or friend. You are the one who will live with your choice for the rest of your life. Make time for it. The reconstruction process can take months and will involve a great deal of time. Plan accordingly by making arrangements with your workplace....
How Radiation Therapy Affects Breast Reconstruction

How Radiation Therapy Affects Breast Reconstruction

Radiation therapy is one of the most powerful tools available today to treat breast cancer. Before, radiation therapy was mostly used on women who had undergone a lumpectomy – a procedure wherein there occurs only a partial removal of breast tissue. However, with advances in technique and technology relative to cancer treatment, radiation therapy has been shown to be equally of value to women who have had mastectomies, specifically to those who have had deterring cancer reoccurrence upon breast augmentation and the subsequent surgery. Women who received a mastectomy might benefit from the use of radiation therapy with breast reconstruction in these cases: • Large tumor sizes • Axillary lymph nodes with the potential for either cancer or quite close surgical resection margins. Timing The issue of timing is very important as it relates to breast reconstruction and radiation therapy. Due to the sensitivity of the treatment schedule, some of the issues that might arise include the timing of: • Reconstruction and chemotherapy • Reconstruction and radiation The timing of reconstruction must also be considered, as it can either occur during the mastectomy or after the procedure. Whether or not you are a suitable candidate for breast surgery during or after your mastectomy depends entirely on your personal history, which is why a specialized and knowledgeable reconstructive surgeon is key. Treatment The primary treatment option for surgery while receiving radiation therapy is the DIEP flap. The surgery involves using the patient’s own tissue while utilizing radiation as needed to mitigate any potential risks for the future outcome of the reconstruction. Finding a reputable surgeon in the Dallas, Texas area...